Council for the Advancement of Science Writing

CASW Periscope

IS THE MARCH FOR SCIENCE IN TROUBLE? Looking at the world map the March for Science organizers have posted about participation in satellite marches around the globe, you will probably be impressed.... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
An egregious example of pharma spin was highlighted by Dr. Vinay Prasad, an oncologist at Oregon Health Sciences University, this week on Twitter. He pointed to a Novartis promotional website for the immunosuppressant drug everolimus (brand name Afinitor) that’s used to treat kidney and other cancers. His annotation of a graphic on the site called... more
Applications for our inaugural Diversity Fellowship are due April 1. The fellowship is for students and early-career science writers undertaking summer science journalism internships. Two fellows will receive $5,000 to supplement any stipends they receive from their summer employer. The fellowship is open to any underrepresented minority who... more
Veteran science journalist Erika Check Hayden, senior reporter for Nature and a longtime lecturer in the science communication program at the University of California, Santa Cruz, became the program’s third director in January. Check Hayden was selected by a committee of UCSC faculty and alumni after a national search. She succeeds current... more
We continue our regular series looking for clear and compelling disconnects between what a headline highlights, and what the referenced study is really about. As you will see below, this past month ended up to be a smorgasbord of food and nutrition stories. Not surprising really. Time and time again we’ve found this to be a genre of health... more
As a 23-year-old postgraduate student working with Edward Teller in 1951, Richard Garwin came up with the design that led to the hydrogen bomb, Joel Shurkin reports. Outside of a small group in Los Alamos, however, Garwin’s role was completely unknown, Shurkin asserts in True Genius: The Life and Work of Richard Garwin, The Most Influential... more
The Annals of Internal Medicine issued a “tip sheet” for journalists last week that a patient advocate for lower back pain believes contributes to medicalization, and may ultimately lead to overtreatment with costly and unproven therapies. The tip sheet came in advance of a study published in this week’s issue of the highly... more
It’s been on the scene for over a decade. The pharmaceutical industry has invested billions in it. Tens of millions of consumers have been exposed to it and there are proposals to try to stop it.   But the big question remaining on everyone’s mind is this: Does direct-to-consumer drug advertising actually work? Just today a new study... more
The Storygram series, in which professional writers annotate award-winning stories to illuminate what makes a great science story great, is a joint project of The Open Notebook and the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing. It is supported by a grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.  Charles Piller is STAT’s West Coast editor... more
Alex Hogan/STAT. (Originally published in STAT. Reprinted with permission from STAT.)   The following story diagram—or Storygram—annotates an award-winning story to shed light on what makes some of the best science writing so outstanding. The Storygram series is a joint project of The Open Notebook and the Council for the Advancement of... more

Pages