Council for the Advancement of Science Writing

CASW Periscope

Marc Bruxelle/iStock   Last year, I was assigned a feature on a new procedure to save the fertility of children and teenagers with cancer. It was a fascinating subject, but it raised a dilemma: How could I interview and write about these young survivors, who had only recently emerged from traumatic cancer treatment, without... more
Quirex/iStock   After several years of freelancing daily news stories for an online medical news site, Bianca Nogrady felt she had a handle on what the publication wanted. She would cover a single new study in each news story, economically summarizing the results in a few hundred words and then submitting her drafts. But one day... more
TheaDesign/iStock   Este artículo se publicó originalmente en inglés en The Open Notebook el 21 de agosto de 2018. Por Aneri Pattani.   En 1974, periodistas científicos de nueve países europeos se reunieron en Salzburgo, Austria, para hablar sobre el futuro del campo. No hizo falta que transcurriera mucho tiempo antes de que... more
The National Academies He Jiankui revealed in November 2018 that that he helped make the world’s first genetically edited babies using CRISPR gene-editing technology.   The story diagrams—or Storygrams—we present on these pages annotate stories to shed light on what makes some of the best science writing so outstanding. The... more
AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein. (Originally published at apnews.com.) He Jiankui revealed in November 2018 that that he helped make the world’s first genetically edited babies using CRISPR gene-editing technology.   The following story diagram—or Storygram—annotates an award-winning story to shed light on what makes some of the best... more
Wikimedia Commons He Jiankui revealed in November 2018 that that he helped make the world’s first genetically edited babies using CRISPR gene-editing technology.   The following story diagram—or Storygram—annotates an award-winning story to shed light on what makes some of the best science writing so outstanding. The Storygram... more
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Eli Chen reports on scientific research and environmental issues at St. Louis Public Radio. Her work has appeared in or aired on NPR, Marketplace, WHYY’s The Pulse, The New York Times, Science Friday, and Scientific American. Born and raised in the Chicago suburbs, her role model growing up was Sue the T. rex at the Field Museum, because everyone... more
  Dear Friends of TON, In the past year, The Open Notebook has published dozens of feature-length articles examining many aspects of the craft of science journalism and examining outstanding works up close through writer interviews and Storygram annotations of award-winning stories. We’ve also added dozens of new pitches to our Pitch... more
Betul Aktas/iStock   Science writing is a great place to develop a beat, build expertise in an area of research, and report in depth on new, interesting work. Many beats are naturally circumscribed by scientific disciplines, such as anthropology, astronomy, energy, environment, or health. Other beats may be defined geographically (for example... more

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