Council for the Advancement of Science Writing

CASW Periscope

We’ve written extensively about the dark side of medical crowdfunding — how donations meant to help desperate patients may perversely promote useless and dangerous interventions. We’ve also looked at the news industry’s complicity with these misguided campaigns — how the crowdfunding stories journalists latch onto... more
The NASW Grants Committee is now accepting applications for 2018-2019 Peggy Girshman Idea Grants. Applications are due by noon ET on Saturday, Dec. 1 2018.
In depth: Six tips for writing accurately about cancer immunotherapy drugs. “Increases life expectancy,” announced Newsweek. “Helped slow an aggressive type of breast cancer,” reported Reuters. “Expected to change the standard of care,” crowed The New York Times. Judging by news reports last weekend, women with... more
It took the Joslin Diabetes Center four paragraphs and three mentions of fathers – as in, “how a father’s exercise regimen would affect his offspring’s metabolic health” –  to finally mention that its research news release was about mouse fathers. Ohio State Medical Center – home to the study’s co-author... more
Throughout the summer, I saw tweet after tweet calling for an end to surprise medical bills, an issue that’s rising in public importance: Do you know how patients like you get hit with #surprisebills? It's the surprise insurance gap — when your plan doesn't cover care you need. In an #emergency, you need your insurance to work for... more
Sonja Punz/Unsplash   The following story diagram—or Storygram—annotates an award-winning story to shed light on what makes some of the best science writing so outstanding. The Storygram series is a joint project of The Open Notebook and the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing. It is supported in part by a grant from the Gordon... more
The Storygram series, in which professional writers annotate award-winning stories to illuminate what makes a great science story great, is a joint project of The Open Notebook and the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing. It is supported by a grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.  Maria Konnikova is the author of two New... more
Here’s another example in our occasional series documenting how the New York Times’ ‘Well’ section is often unwell. This time it’s a brief story claiming that “Coffee may tame the redness of rosacea.” Let’s start with the fact that this study was observational and had many limitations, which we... more
There are voices in healthcare that don’t get heard nearly enough; certainly the general public may not even know they exist. That’s understandable in a time when many of us feel swamped by too much information coming at us from too many directions. It can be difficult to sift through all the choices and separate the substantive from... more

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