New Horizons in Science

presented by
CASW

New Horizons in Science 2018 Speakers

professor of applied social psychology
Department of Psychology, George Washington University; director, Social and Behavioral Sciences Core, D.C. Center for AIDS Research
Lisa Bowleg is a leading scholar of the application of intersectionality to social and behavioral science research, as well as research focused on HIV prevention and sexuality in black communities. Her qualitative and quantitative research focuses on the effects of social-structural context, masculinity, and resilience on black men’s sexual HIV risk and protective behaviors; and intersectionality, stress, and resilience among black lesbian, gay, and bisexual people. She has served as the principal investigator of three NIH-funded R01 studies focused on HIV prevention with black heterosexual men in the U.S. She is also the principal investigator of The Intersectionality Toolkit Project, a grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation to develop an intersectionality checklist, case studies, and an implementation guide for policymakers and organizations who develop programs and policies for diverse women and families. In 2014, the American Psychological Association’s Committee on Psychology and AIDS awarded her its Psychology and AIDS Distinguished Leadership Award.
 

director of research communications
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Terry Devitt has covered the science waterfront at University of Wisconsin-Madison for more than three decades. He has been writing about human embryonic stem cells since they were first derived in a small, non-descript laboratory at the University of Wisconsin in 1998.

Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science, John A. Paulson School of Engineering & Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Radcliffe Alumnae Professor, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, distinguished scientist, Microsoft
Cynthia Dwork is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the U.S. National Academy of Engineering. She has made pioneering contributions to the fields of distributed computing, cryptography, and privacy-preserving data analysis, specifically the introduction and development of differential privacy and its application to reproducibility of results. Her most recent focus is algorithmic fairness.
 

director of communications and outreach, the Joint Quantum Institute
University of Maryland

Emily Edwards is a science communicator who specializes in making illustrations. She oversees the public information efforts for the University of Maryland Physics Department and the Joint Center for Quantum Information and Computer Science. Her team’s communication products include news stories, graphics, and the podcast “Relatively Certain.” Edwards leads a National Science Foundation sponsored project that aims to build a visually-driven quantum physics web application for non-expert learners. Prior to getting into science communication, she attended graduate school in physics at the University of Maryland. She is passionate about increasing public awareness, appreciation, and understanding of physics and also enjoys building demos and talking to kids about science

professor of global health and international studies and director, Global Women's Institute
George Washington University
Mary Ellsberg is the founding director of the Global Women’s Institute, a university-wide institute dedicated to producing policy-oriented research to promote gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls. She has more than 30 years of experience in international research and program work on gender and public health issues. Her deep connection to global gender issues stems not only from her academic work but also from living in Nicaragua for nearly 20 years leading public health and women’s rights advocacy. She was a member of the core research team of the World Health Organization’s multicountry study on domestic violence and women’s health. Ellsberg has written more than 40 books and articles on gender-based violence and ethical and methodological aspects of violence research. She earned a doctorate in epidemiology and public health from Umea University in Sweden and a bachelor's degree in Latin American studies from Yale University.
 
Twitter: @MaryEllsberg

research professor, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia
Manaus, Brazil
Philip Fearnside, an ecologist at Brazil’s National Institute for Research in Amazonia, has lived and worked in the Brazilian Amazon for over 40 years and is one of the foremost authorities on global warming and deforestation in the world’s largest tropical forest. After completing a biology degree at Colorado College, Fearnside went to India as a Peace Corps volunteer working on fisheries in reservoirs (and dams remain one of his major interests). He then earned a Ph.D. at the University of Michigan, where he turned his attention to the Amazon after India barred American researchers following Nixon’s “tilt” towards Pakistan in the Bangladesh war. His research has tackled issues related to deforestation, dams, climate change, and environmental services. He is the author of hundreds of publications and a book, Human Carrying Capacity of the Brazilian Amazon. In 2006 Thompson-ISI identified him as the world’s second most-cited scientist on the subject of global warming, and in 2011 as the seventh in the area of sustainable development. He has received many national and international honors, including the U.N. Global 500 Award, the Conrad Wessel Prize, the Chico Mendes Prize, and election to the Brazilian Academy of Science.
 

research professor, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia
Manaus, Brazil
Philip Fearnside, an ecologist at Brazil’s National Institute for Research in Amazonia, has lived and worked in the Brazilian Amazon for over 40 years and is one of the foremost authorities on global warming and deforestation in the world’s largest tropical forest. After completing a biology degree at Colorado College, Fearnside went to India as a Peace Corps volunteer working on fisheries in reservoirs (and dams remain one of his major interests). He then earned a Ph.D. at the University of Michigan, where he turned his attention to the Amazon after India barred American researchers following Nixon’s “tilt” towards Pakistan in the Bangladesh war. His research has tackled issues related to deforestation, dams, climate change, and environmental services. He is the author of hundreds of publications and a book, Human Carrying Capacity of the Brazilian Amazon. In 2006 Thompson-ISI identified him as the world’s second most-cited scientist on the subject of global warming, and in 2011 as the seventh in the area of sustainable development. He has received many national and international honors, including the U.N. Global 500 Award, the Conrad Wessel Prize, the Chico Mendes Prize, and election to the Brazilian Academy of Science.
 

Independent journalist
Peru
From Mexico to Tierra del Fuego, Barbara Fraser has reported on topics as varied as retreating glaciers, oil spills in the Amazon, and the search for South America's earliest inhabitants. She has lived in Peru for nearly 30 years and has worked as a full-time freelance journalist since 2003, specializing in environment, science and public health, as well as issues affecting indigenous peoples. Her work has appeared in Nature, Science, EcoAméricas, Sapiens, The Lancet, Mongabay.com, National Geographic Online, and other publications. 
 

senior reporter
Nature
Elizabeth Gibney joined _Nature_ as a physical sciences reporter in 2013, after working for _Times Higher Education_ and the U.K.-based science policy publications _Research Fortnight_ and _Research Europe._ Before that, she spent two years as a staff writer at CERN, Europe’s high-energy physics laboratory. Gibney has a degree in natural sciences from the University of Cambridge and a M.Sc. in science communication from Imperial College London. At _Nature_ she covers topics ranging from quantum physics to Brexit, in print, online, audio and video formats.
 
Twitter: @LizzieGibney

professor, Annenberg School for Communication, director, Annenberg Public Policy Center
University of Pennsylvania
Kathleen Hall Jamieson has authored or co-authored 16 books, including *Cyberwar, Spiral of Cynicism* and *The Obama Victory: How Media, Money and Message Shaped the 2008 Election*, which won the American Publishers Association's PROSE award in 2010.  Her paper “Implications of the Demise of ‘Fact’ in Political Discourse” received the American Philosophical Society’s 2016 Henry Allen Moe Prize.  Jamieson is a co-founder of [FactCheck.org](http://factcheck.org) and its subsidiary site, [SciCheck](https://www.factcheck.org/scicheck/), which monitors political speech for the misuse of science. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, the American Academy of Political and Social Science, and the International Communication Association.
 
Twitter @APPCPenn

professor
Department of Cell Biology & Human Anatomy, Genome Center, Comprehensive Cancer Center & Institute for Regenerative Cures, University of California Davis School of Medicine
Paul Knoepfler is a at the UC Davis School of Medicine who is also interested in bioethics and policy research. For more than eight years, he has been running “The Niche” a blog on stem cells and other cutting-edge life science technologies that in part serves as a check on predatory, for-profit stem cell clinics. He helped to develop the new California law on stem cell clinics that requires the businesses to post notices to patients. His TED talk on the potential use of CRISPR in humans to make designer babies has had more than 1.2 million views. He was also recently on Bill Nye’s new show as a guest panelist on the same topic. He has written two books: Stem Cells: An Insider’s Guide and GMO Sapiens: The Life-Changing Science of Designer Babies. In addition to his own science writing, he is a go-to biologist for science journalists.
 
Twitter: @pknoepfler

professor of astrophysics, director, Astronomy, Physics, and Statistics Institute of Sciences (APSIS)
George Washington University
Chryssa Kouveliotou is an affiliate scientist of NASA’s Swift and Fermi GBM missions, and she is the science team chair of the Transient Astrophysics Observatory on the International Space Station (TAO-ISS). In 2015, she retired as a senior scientist of high-energy astrophysics at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. She has been the principal investigator of numerous research projects in the U.S. and in Europe, winning over $4 million in grant support. She is a founding member of multiple scientific collaborations worldwide and has served on more than 20 Ph.D. committees in the U.S. and internationally. Kouveliotou has 462 refereed publications and coedited three books. She has received the Descartes, Rossi, and Heineman Prizes and a decoration as a Commander of the Order of the Honor by the Greek government. She is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Dutch Royal Academy, and the Greek National Academy. She obtained her Ph.D. from the Technical University of Munich and two honorary doctorates from the University of Amsterdam and the University of Sussex. 
 

associate professor of anthropology, international affairs, and Africana studies, George Washington University, director of the Diaspora Research Program, George Washington University;, research associate, Smithsonian Institution National Museum of African American History and Culture
As a maritime archaeologist and scholar of heritage, Stephen Lubkemann has conducted research in North America, the Caribbean, and Africa for over two decades. In 2008, he cofounded and serves as the international coordinator of the Slave Wrecks Project, an international collaboration of more than 80 scholars in 11 countries. He coauthored the best-selling volume From No Return: the 221 Year Voyage of the Slave Ship São Jose (Smithsonian Institution Press, 2016) about the slave shipwreck whose artifacts are featured at the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. His research as a cultural anthropologist has focused on social change in war-torn societies (Angola, Mozambique, Liberia, South Africa) with a particular focus on diaspora politics, refugees, and displacement; development and humanitarian action; and post-conflict justice and rule of law. His book Culture in Chaos (University of Chicago Press, 2008), which examines the social effects of the Mozambican civil war, was a finalist for the Herskovits Award of the African Studies Association. He has published dozens of peer-reviewed articles and book chapters and coedited four peer-reviewed volumes, including the leading reader on Africa, Perspectives on Africa: A Reader in Culture, History, and Representation  (Wiley-Blackwell 2010) and the forthcoming A Companion to the Anthropology of Africa (Wiley-Blackwell, 2018).
 

director, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research
U.S. Food and Drug Administration

As director of the FDA's CBER, Peter Marks oversees biological products including vaccines, blood and blood products, and cellular, tissue, and gene therapies. A physician and research scientist, he received his graduate degree in cell and molecular biology and his medical degree at New York University. He worked at Brigham and Women's Hospital, in the pharmaceutical industry, and then at Yale University. He joined the FDA in 2012 as deputy director of CBER and became director in 2016. Marks is board certified in internal medicine, hematology and medical oncology and is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians.

 

associate professor, Milken Institute School of Public Health
George Washington University
Sociologist and filmmaker Sabrina McCormick investigates the social factors that determine how quickly we can mitigate and adapt to climate change. She also investigates why diverse groups respond to information about climate change and take action or not, how and why U.S. cities act on climate change, and the health risks associated with a changing climate. McCormick makes films that tell the human story behind climate change. Her award-winning fiction and documentary films include the feature Tribe, set in the Brazilian Amazon, and two segments of the Emmy-winning Showtime series The Years of Living Dangerously, among other projects produced by her company, Evidence Based Media. She was a Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania and an AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the Environmental Protection Agency. Her policy experience includes advising cities, the White House, members of Congress and the U.S. Department of State. She has written two books and more than 50 articles and book chapters. 
 
Twitter: @sabmc

associate professor, Milken Institute School of Public Health
George Washington University
Sociologist and filmmaker Sabrina McCormick investigates the social factors that determine how quickly we can mitigate and adapt to climate change. She also investigates why diverse groups respond to information about climate change and take action or not, how and why U.S. cities act on climate change, and the health risks associated with a changing climate. McCormick makes films that tell the human story behind climate change. Her award-winning fiction and documentary films include the feature Tribe, set in the Brazilian Amazon, and two segments of the Emmy-winning Showtime series The Years of Living Dangerously, among other projects produced by her company, Evidence Based Media. She was a Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania and an AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the Environmental Protection Agency. Her policy experience includes advising cities, the White House, members of Congress and the U.S. Department of State. She has written two books and more than 50 articles and book chapters. 
 
Twitter: @sabmc

Distinguished University Professor & Bice Seci-Zorn Professor, Joint Quantum Institute, Center for Quantum Information and Computer Science
University of Maryland
Christopher Monroe is a quantum physicist who specializes in the isolation of individual atoms for applications in quantum information science. In 1995, he led a team at National Institute of Standards and Technology that demonstrated the first quantum logic gate, exploiting trapped atoms for the first controllable qubit demonstrations. At the University of Michigan and now at the University of Maryland, he has continued his work using atoms as the building blocks for quantum computers, finding new ways to scale up the number of connected trapped-ion qubits and taking the first steps toward a scalable, reconfigurable, and modular quantum computer. In addition to his academic position, he is cofounder and chief scientist at IonQ in College Park, Md.
 

space history curator
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Valerie Neal has been a space history curator at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum since 1989 and is current chair of the Space History Department. Her research, exhibition, and collection responsibilities focus on human spaceflight in the space shuttle era and beyond. She has written a book on spaceflight, a biography of the space shuttle Discovery, and a book about space science on the shuttle in the 1980s. She has also edited two books on space exploration, published a variety of essays and short pieces, curated three major exhibitions: on the U.S.-Soviet space race, spaceflight in and beyond the space shuttle era, and the challenges of future exploration. She curated eight “Smithsonian Channel” documentaries. Before joining the Smithsonian, Neal spent a decade in Huntsville, Alabama, as a writer, editor and manager for more than 25 NASA publications on shuttle and Spacelab missions, the space sciences, NASA’s Great Observatories and astrophysics, and NASA history. She also participated in underwater astronaut crew training activities and worked in mission support for four shuttle missions. She has taught at the University of Minnesota, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, Vanderbilt University, and Georgetown University.

associate professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy
Union College, Schenectady, New York
Chad Orzel is the author of three books explaining science for non-scientists: How to Teach Quantum Physics to Your Dog and How to Teach Relativity to Your Dog. The books explain modern physics through imaginary conversations with Emmy, his German shepherd. He is also author of Eureka: Discovering Your Inner Scientist on the role of scientific thinking in everyday life. He has a B.A. in physics from Williams College and a Ph.D. in chemical physics from the University of Maryland, College Park, where he did his thesis research on collisions of laser-cooled atoms at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in the lab of Bill Phillips, who shared the 1997 Nobel Prize in physics (not for anything Chad did, but it was a fun time to be in that group). His blog, Uncertain Principles, appeared at scienceblogs.com from 2002 to 2017, and currently he blogs for Forbes. His next book, Breakfast with Einstein: The Exotic Physics of an Ordinary Morning, will be published in December 2018 by BenBella Books (U.S.) and Oneworld Publications (U.K.). 
 
Twitter: @orzelc

executive secretary, National Space Council, former director, Space Policy Institute,George Washington University

Over the course of his career, Scott Pace has honed his expertise in the areas of science, space, and technology. In 2017, President Trump nominated him to serve as the executive secretary for the National Space Council, which streamlines and coordinates U.S. space policy and strategy. Previously, he was the director of the Space Policy Institute and professor of the practice of international affairs at George Washington University. He has also served at NASA, the White House Office of Science and Technology, and the RAND Corporation Science and Technology Policy Institute. Pace has received numerous awards including the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal (2008), the U.S. Department of State Group Superior Honor Award, GPS Interagency Team (2005), and the NASA Group Achievement Award, Columbia Accident Rapid Reaction Team (2004). He received his B.S. in physics from Harvey Mudd College in 1980. Two years later, he earned a master's degree in aeronautics and astronautics, and technology and policy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received his doctorate in policy analysis from the RAND Graduate School in 1989.

Carbonell Family Professor and director, Autism & Neurodevelopmental Disorders Institute
George Washington University
Kevin Pelphrey is an internationally renowned neuroscientist and the parent of a young woman with autism. He utilizes brain science to develop biologically based tools for detection, stratification, and individually tailored treatments. He leads the National Institutes of Health Autism Center for Excellence-Multimodal Developmental Neurogenetics of Autism network, which spans seven national sites. He also directs an NIH postdoctoral training program to prepare scientist clinicians for independent careers translating multidisciplinary science into novel treatments for neurodevelopmental disorders. The Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders Institute serves as a focal point for translational research and comprehensive clinical services for autism, while also serving as a beacon for policymakers seeking information on issues surrounding policy, research, and treatment of autism.
 

Apollo 17 astronaut, former U.S. senator, R-N.M., associate fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, member of the National Space Council Users Advisory Group

Selected for the scientist-astronaut program in 1965, Harrison Schmitt organized the lunar science training for the Apollo astronauts, represented the crews during the development of hardware and procedures for lunar surface exploration, and oversaw the final preparation of the Apollo 11 Lunar Module Descent Stage. He was designated mission scientist in support of the Apollo 11 mission. After training as backup lunar module pilot for Apollo 15, he served as lunar module pilot for Apollo 17, the last Apollo mission to the moon. On December 11, 1972, he landed in the Valley of Taurus-Littrow as the only scientist and the last of 12 astronauts to step on the moon. In 1975, after spending two years managing NASA's Energy Program Office, Schmitt fulfilled a longstanding personal commitment by entering politics. Elected in 1976, he served a six-year term in the U.S. Senate beginning in 1977. The only natural scientist to serve in the Senate since Thomas Jefferson served as vice president, Schmitt was a member of the Senate Commerce, Banking, Appropriations, Intelligence, and Ethics Committees. In his last two years in the Senate, he chaired the Commerce Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space as well as the Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education. He also has served as chairman of the NASA Advisory Council. His scientific research concentrates primarily on the synthesis of data related to the origin and evolution of the moon and the terrestrial planets and on the economic geology of the lunar regolith and its resources. Currently he is an associate fellow in engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, teaching “Resources from Space.” His book, Return to the Moon: Exploration, Enterprise and Energy in the Human Settlement of Space, was published by Springer in 2006. Since 1964, he has been the author of many scientific journal papers and book chapters related to exploration, space, and lunar science.

President Emerita and professor of molecular biology
Princeton University

Shirley M. Tilghman, a mammalian developmental geneticist, returned to teaching in 2013 after serving as Princeton University’s 19th president beginning in 2001. During her earlier research career, she studied the way in which genes are organized in the genome and regulated during early development and was a member of the team that cloned the first mammalian gene. She was one of the founding members of the National Advisory Council of the Human Genome Project for the National Institutes of Health. A member of the Princeton faculty since 1986, she is an Officer of the Order of Canada and the recipient of a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society for Developmental Biology, the Genetics Society of America Medal, and the L’Oreal-UNESCO Award for Women in Science. She is a member of the American Philosophical Society, the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine and The Royal Society of London. She serves as a trustee of Amherst College, the Institute for Advanced Study, the Simons Foundation, and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology. She also serves on the Science Advisory Board of the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, is a director of The Broad Institute and is a Fellow of the Corporation of Harvard College.

professor of chemistry, biochemistry, and molecular biology
George Washington University
Akos Vertes’s research focuses on developing new analytical techniques that can be applied to diverse fields of chemistry, biology, and medicine. His research includes high-throughput and ultrasensitive methods in systems biology, proteomics and metabolomics, new methods for molecular imaging of biological tissues under native conditions, and single cell and subcellular analysis. One of his major accomplishments, a new ionization method called laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI), has received several awards. LAESI was named one of the Top 10 Innovations of 2011 by The Scientist magazine and earned a 2012 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine. His research has been presented in more than 160 peer-reviewed publications and two books. He is a coinventor on 17 patents and several pending patent applications. He was elected fellow of the National Academy of Inventors and received the 2012 Hillebrand Prize and the Oscar and Shoshana Trachtenberg Prize for Scholarship. He is a doctor of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. Vertes has served as visiting faculty at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and as a visiting professor at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETH Zurich) in Switzerland.
 

remote sensing geophysicist, Volcano Disaster Assistance Program
U.S. Geological Survey

Rick Wessels leads the volcano remote sensing team for the Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP) which is cofunded by the USGS and the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance. VDAP responds to volcano crises in Latin America, Southeast Asia, and Africa through both local and remote interactions with in-country volcano observatories. Wessels also leads the high-resolution remote sensing responses to U.S. volcanoes with his team at the USGS National Civil Applications Center (NCAC) in Reston, Va. He and his team monitor over 150 volcanoes around the globe using satellite remote sensing. Wessels and the NCAC team have been heavily involved in daily monitoring and mapping of the changes at the ongoing Kilauea Volcano eruption.

assistant professor, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health
George Washington University
Ami Zota focuses on environmental justice and improving health equity through advancements in science, policy, and clinical practice. Her research identifies novel pathways linking social disparities, environmental exposures, and reproductive and children’s health. She is also committed to developing innovative approaches to science communication so that her research can more effectively be used to inform individual and collective decision-making. She has helped shape health and safety standards for consumer product chemicals by participating in legislative briefings, providing technical assistance to nongovernmental organizations, and communicating through mainstream and social media outlets. She received a career development award from the National Institutes of Health for her research on environmental health disparities and was recently recognized as a Pioneer Under 40 in Environmental Public Health by the Collaborative on Health and the Environment. She is an associate editor of _Journal of Exposure Science_ and _Environmental Epidemiology_ and serves on the editorial boards of Environmental Health Perspectives and Environmental Epigenetics. She received her master’s and doctorate in environmental health at the Harvard School of Public Health and completed postdoctoral fellowships at Silent Spring Institute and UCSF Program on Reproductive Health.
 
Twitter: @amizota

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